Monday, December 5, 2016

Visibility is key, say B.C.’s top women in business - BUSINESS VANCOUVER

by Albert Van Santvoort 
Originally published: December 1, 2016
Publisher: BIV.com 

Two of the 21 British Columbians honoured as the Top 100 most powerful women in Canada agree that they key to helping increase the gender diversity in corporate leadership is to raise the visibility of female leaders.

“To sit with 100 amazing women, some young, some old, some in entrepreneurial startup roles through to established organizations, to see that diversity all in one place and to provide that kind of visibility to folks who may be watching the event, I think that’s a big part of the solution,” said Laurie Schultz, who is president and CEO of business software company ACL and was recently named one of the Women’s Executive Network’s (WXN) Top 100 most powerful women in Canada.

WXN honoured 21 British Columbians as part of their Top 100 on November 24, but at least one of those women is concerned that B.C. may be behind the rest of North America.

“I’ve seen a lot more women in technology leadership roles in North America than I’ve seen specifically in B.C., which is why it’s so great to see leaders like Shannon Rogers from Global Relay Communications,” said Schultz.


10 Best Workplaces for Latinos - FORTUNE

Originally published: December 5, 2016
Publisher: Fortune.com 

Where Latino employees say they love to work.

These are the companies that received the highest marks from their Latino employees, according to data collected by Fortune partner Great Place to Work. Rankings are based on employees’ sentiment on workplace fairness, opportunities for advancement, and job satisfaction, along with other workplace statistics. The quotes below were given by companies’ Latino staff. For more on great workplaces, see Fortune’s list of best companies for overall diversity, along with our lists for African-Americans and Asian-Americans.


10 Best Workplaces for African-Americans - FORTUNE

Originally published: December 5, 2016
Publisher: Fortune.com 

Where African-American employees say they love to work.

These are the companies that received the highest marks from their African-American employees, according to data collected by Fortune partner Great Place to Work. Rankings are based on employees’ sentiment on workplace fairness, opportunities for advancement, and job satisfaction, along with other workplace statistics. The quotes below were given by companies’ African-American staff. For more on great workplaces, see Fortune’s list of best overall companies for diversity, along with our lists of best companies for Latinos and Asian-Americans.


10 Best Workplaces for Asian-Americans - FORTUNE

Originally published: December 5, 2016
Publisher: Fortune.com 

Where Asian-American employees say they love to work.

These are the companies that received the highest marks from their Asian-American employees, according to data collected by Fortune partner Great Place to Work. Rankings are based on employees’ sentiment on workplace fairness, opportunities for advancement, and job satisfaction, along with other workplace statistics. The quotes below were given by companies’ Asian-American staff. For more on great workplaces, see Fortune’s list of best companies for overall diversity, and our lists for Latinos and African-Americans.


Is Your Culture “Millennial Ready?” - TLNT

by Jason Carney 
Originally published:  December 1, 2016
Publisher: TLNT.com 

Millennials — they’re different from any other generation of worker, and they’ll soon be the majority of the workforce.

Because of this huge growth in population of millennial employees, employers have to adapt their business operations accordingly. Their differences from other working generations can pose challenges for employers, but they also bring new characteristics and opinions into the workplace that employers can integrate into their current operational structure and culture to bring about further success.

According to The 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey, employees who share their organization’s values are more likely to remain with the employer for an extended period of time. So, how does an employer ensure they introduce values that are important to the new generation of worker? Here is a good starting point: take a look at how millennials live their life outside of work, and integrate these four values in your business:


Hilton Named a Best Place to Work for LGBT Equality - YAHOO

Originally published: December 5, 2016
Publisher: Yahoo.com 

Hilton (HLT) announced today that it received a perfect score on the 2017 Corporate Equality Index (CEI), a national benchmarking survey and report on corporate policies and practices related to LGBT workplace equality, administered by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation (HRC). The honor marks Hilton’s fourth consecutive year earning a percent score on the CEI, designating the company as a Best Place to Work for LGBT Equality again this year.

This Smart News Release features multimedia. View the full release here: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20161205005651/en/

“We are proud to be named a Best Place to Work for LGBT Equality for the fourth year in a row. This prestigious recognition from HRC underscores our commitment to recruiting and retaining a workforce that represents many different cultures, backgrounds and viewpoints,” said Matthew W. Schuyler, chief human resources officer, Hilton. “As a business of people serving people, diversity and inclusion have been embedded in our culture since our founding more than 100 years ago. We look forward to continuing to champion equality for Team Members, guests and owners alike.”


"Trans People Are Not A Monolith": Janet Mock Wants To Introduce You To 11 New Friends - FASTCOMPANY

by KC IFEANYI
Originally published: December 2, 2016
Publisher: FastCompany.com 

In 2013, author, journalist, and transgender activist Janet Mock appeared in HBO’s documentary The Out List. Director and portrait photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders had previously explored other identities in The Black List (2008) and The Latino List (2011) by interviewing prominent figures within each community about their personal and professional experiences of living as, by and large, marginalized members of society. The Out List featured high-wattage stars like Ellen DeGeneres and Neil Patrick Harris, but Mock, who is also one of Fast Company's Most Creative People, was the sole "T" in the alphabet soup of the LGBTQIA community. As important as something like The Out List is to help advance conversations around topics like gay rights, Mock believed the trans movement had enough public figures and momentum behind it to narrow the focus for another "list."