Friday, August 18, 2017

Ava DuVernay on Why Netflix Understands Artists and Diversity - VARIETY

by Ramin Setoodeh 
Originally published: August 15, 2017
Publisher: Variety.com 

Netflix reached out to me with an offer that I’d never heard before. Come and make what you’d like to make. We’d like to work with you as an artist, and we’ll support you in that vision. That sounded a little too good to be true. I was attracted by the prospects of a fraction of it. What I ended up getting was so much more.

It truly is a safe, productive artist space. Helping hands is what the creative experience is like. I was able to go off and do my thing. That all comes from Ted Sarandos, because he’s created an environment where all the executives feel so confident they don’t have to hold on to everything so tightly. Their notes are very normal — not like studio notes. They are not prescriptive. I never got a note that said, “Fix this.” This is the first place I ever went to where somebody said: “Gosh, I love this. Don’t you want to do more?” I don’t have the money for that. “Oh, we’ll give you some more money.” What kind of place is this?!




These slides from Google's diversity training program may help explain why fired engineer felt silenced - CNBC

by John Shinal
Originally published: August 16, 2017
Publisher: CNBC.com 

Google's diversity program discourages debate on the topic of bias and encourages employees who participate in anti-bias training to keep details of the sessions secret, according to slides for leaders and participants of one such session used by the company.

At least two of the slides back up some of the claims by fired engineer James Damore, who after attending such a session wrote a memo calling Google "an ideological echo chamber where some ideas are too sacred to be honestly discussed."

The memo led to his firing and has ignited a nationwide firestorm over what he wrote and how Google management has responded.



5 Ways Men Can Be Women's Allies At Work - FORBES

by Emilie Aries 
Originally published: August 16, 2017
Publisher: Forbes.com 

As I looked out into the crowd at a recent conference where I was speaking, I saw a sea of women ready to develop their leadership skills, hone their assertive communication, and invest in their professional advancement.

Sitting in the far back right of the room was a lone white man, who throughout the entire weekend sat quietly, listened attentively, and took notes. At the very end of the weekend, as I was about to roll out to the airport, he thanked me for the insights he had gained - not only from what was presented but also from the experience of sitting in a room full of people who identify as women, from all walks of life, sharing their experiences, frustrations, and triumphs in a world where women leaders still face gender bias in all it’s overt and covert forms.



Can Waterloo's women-only residence help close the engineering gap? - CTV NEWS

by Josh Dehaas 
Originally published: August 16, 2017
Publisher: CTVnews.ca 


In high school, Mariko Shimoda knew she liked science and math but wasn’t sure what program to apply for in university.

In eleventh grade, she spent a weekend with about 50 other girls at the University of Waterloo, in Waterloo, Ont. The outreach event featured speeches from successful female engineers, a tour of Google’s local office and a workshop where the girls took apart an engine.

Shimoda had never tinkered with her dad’s car and had opted for student’s council over robotics club, so the engine dissection gave her a needed jolt of confidence. For the first time, she says, “I could see myself actually working with that kind of stuff.”



Intel’s Latest Diversity Report Is Good News for Culture Change - FORTUNE

by Ellen McGirt
Originally published: August 15, 2017
Publisher: Fortune.com 

So here’s a big question for a Tuesday. Why are people racist?

Two scientists, interviewed by The Washington Post offer an explanation so simple that even Occam would approve. People are racist because everything in their culture points to a racial hierarchy. It is in the air we breathe. It is normal to us.

“In some ways, it’s super simple. People learn to be whatever their society and culture teaches them. We often assume that it takes parents actively teaching their kids, for them to be racist. The truth is that unless parents actively teach kids not to be racists, they will be,” said Jennifer Richeson, a Yale University social psychologist. “This is not the product of some deep-seated, evil heart that is cultivated. It comes from the environment, the air all around us.”



How To Teach Children About Autism - CARE

Originally published: August 15, 2017
Publisher: Care2.com 

Let’s face it: children have a mind of their own, and, for the most part, they like to speak their mind, even if what they say isn’t necessarily appropriate. However, as parents, it is important that we encourage their ability to speak their minds while also guiding them through social etiquette as well. Although the basic aspects of social interaction are quickly taught, the more specific instances are all too often forgotten in the mix, and, in a world that prides itself on diversity, it is crucial that these eccentricities are embraced from people of all ages.

The unfortunate part of this is that many children are born with the differences the average child knows little to nothing about. In turn, ridicule often ensues, and the effects are not only devastating but completely unnecessary. In fact, by taking the time to sit down with your child and tell them about these specific instances, you can not only help create a more inclusive and compassionate generation but also help your child to not judge a book by its cover, and to show respect to other human beings, no matter what they face or who they are.


White Supremacists Still Exist. Here’s What White Parents Can Do About It. - HUFFINGTONPOST

by Caroline Bologna
Originally published: August 16, 2017
Publisher: Huffingtonpost.com 

Following the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend, many Americans are wondering what they can do to push back against hatred and bigotry in 2017.  

On Saturday, violence erupted at the “Unite the Right” rally, as a 20-year-old man named James Alex Fields allegedly drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters. A 32-year-old woman named Heather Heyer was killed, and at least 19 people were injured. 

Though President Donald Trump’s response to the violence has been described as “disgusting,” “terrifying,” and “ignorance to the point of callousness,” everyday citizens are seeking ways to fight white supremacy on big and small scales. In particular, parents of white children are seeking guidance for raising engaged, conscientious people who stand up for what is right.