Thursday, March 31, 2016

Diversity Moments: Community Across Generations - GLOBAL LEARNING

Product Type: eLearning

Product Description: “Diversity Moments”

“Diversity Moments” is a unique and innovative approach to “just in time” organizational learning. This creative and comprehensive series of on-line learning “vignettes’’ is designed to introduce the user to situational aspects of diversity and inclusion content. Concise and thought provoking, these scenarios provide the learner with context, decision points, and a take-away in 3 to 5 minutes of interactive web-based training. “Diversity Moments” are powered by Global Learning Inc..

Topic Description: Communicating Across Generations

Our workplace values and attitudes are expressed through communication. Each generation’s communication style is unique to its members and can cause misunderstandings for other groups. This course will teach you how to deal with inter-generational conflict, and start communicating in the most effective way possible.
Contact us – for more information. 


New Calgarians urge transit officers to be more educated on diversity - METRONEWS

by Helen Pike 
Originally published: March 30, 2016
Publisher: Metronews.ca 

Transit said ticket mishaps are common in policing, apologized

These were only a few of the emotions running through Aneela Arif's head when she was asked to step off the CTrain by a group of male peace officers who told her the pass she had purchased weeks ago wasn't hers.

Arif immigrated to Canada from Pakistan. She's alone in a strange country surrounded by uniformed men.

"It was trauma for a few moments," Arif said. "What's going on. My husband's not with me. What are they talking about? I got this pass myself, I got it. How can I make them think I haven't done anything?"

She was holding a low income pass, which was purchased by her, but by mistake registered under her husband's name. Those passes are non-transferrable, so, in the eyes of the transit cops, she was in the wrong.

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Why The Gender Leadership Gap Is So Much Worse For Women Of Color - FASTCOMPANY

by Lydia Dishman 
Originally published: March 30, 2016
Publisher: Fastcompany.com 

For black, Hispanic, and Asian women, negative stereotypes and unconscious bias have widened the gender gap.

"From corporate boardrooms to the halls of Congress, from universities to the courts, from religious institutions to philanthropic organizations, men are simply much more likely than women to be leaders." This, according to a new report from the American Association of University Women (AAUW).

This isn't news to anyone who has been paying attention, but this new study does bring the persistence and complexity of such underrepresentation into more focus.

The report, titled "Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership," examines the environment where leadership develops and was written by AAUW vice president for research Catherine Hill; senior researcher Kevin Miller; research associate Kathleen Benson; and research intern Grace Handley. They contend that no amount of leaning in can close the systemic gender gap in the top ranks of organizations. That's partly because factors such as race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability status, sexual orientation, gender identity, and age make for unique experiences for any women who tries to rise to leadership.

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Diversity In The Workplace Starts With Diversity In Higher Education - FORBES

by Deborah Bial, Ed.D. 
Originally published: March 30, 2016
Publisher: Forbes.com 

There are close to 3,000 four-year colleges and universities in the United States.  A small percentage are considered elite institutions of higher education.  Degrees from these particular institutions are golden tickets, giving the recipients special access to the best opportunities in the American workforce.

Who, exactly, gets the opportunity to receive these golden tickets?  In a country where the demographics are changing rapidly, we should expect its rich diversity to be reflected in all our educational institutions and certainly at our top colleges.  Unfortunately, this is not the case.

SAT scores still play a significant role in determining who has access to these institutions. Many see the SAT as one of the most important parts of a college application and believe (incorrectly) that a higher score is equal to greater intelligence. Many want the SAT to be the determining arbiter of who is admitted.  Though the College Board defends the SAT as a good predictor of first year GPA and even persistence in college, its most recent report shows that students with lower scores can and do compete in many instances with the same success as their high–scoring counterparts.

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New Report Urges Schools to Collect Data on Their LGBT Students - GLAMOUR

by Jillian Kramer 
Originally published: March 29, 2016
Publisher: Glamour.com 

As battles over bathrooms rage in several states—lawmakers attempting to restrict transgender students and residents from the restrooms that match their gender identity—a new report suggests a novel idea: School districts should collect more data about their LGBT students to protect them from bullying and unfair discipline at their schools.

The Documenting Disparities for LGBT Students report, released Sunday by the Equity Project at Indiana University, asks lawmakers to issue two federal surveys, which would be administered anonymously by school districts to their students. The surveys would ask questions about sexual orientation and gender identity, in an attempt to determine whether the policy changes meant to help LGBT youth are actually working—and whether schools are discriminating against LGBT students.

“When we fail to ask questions about youths’ sexual orientation and gender identity, we fail to understand, support, and protect all students from discrimination in schools,” the report says.

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Employing people with disabilities good for business - SCOOP

Originally published: March 29, 2016
Publisher: Scoop.co.nz

Employing people with disabilities good for business, customers

People with disabilities can look forward to even more employment opportunities thanks to a partnership between Z Energy and specialist employment service Workbridge, announced today.

A new Workbridge Employer Ambassador role, created in partnership with Z Energy, will play a key role in helping employers across New Zealand proactively create more opportunities for people with disabilities.

From 18 April, former Z retailer from the Waikato Region and the winner of this year’s Kiwibank Local Hero of the Year award, Selwyn Cook, will be taking on the role.

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Paternity Leave Canada: 5 Countries That Have A Lot To Teach Us - HUFFINGTONPOST

by Roslyn Costanzo
Originally published: March 29, 2016
Publisher: Huffingtonpost.ca

In recent years, most of the world's 34 richest countries have developed policies that grant dads paid paternity leave or set aside a portion of parental leave exclusively for dads, known as "daddy quotas." But not Canada.

The benefits of paternity leave are many. "Father's leave is linked to more involvement in child-care activities such as helping a baby to eat, changing [diapers], getting up in the night, bathing and reading to a child," explains Dr. Jennifer Baxter of the Australian Institute for Family Studies.

Her research on the topic makes the link between a dad's heightened involvement in the early years and a baby's increased cognitive abilities. Other studies prove that dads who are hands-on from the beginning have a positive impact on their child's academic performance as far down the road as high school.



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Women over 65 double participation in workforce, Statistics Canada finds - CBC

Originally published: March 30, 2016
Publisher CBC.ca 

About 90 per cent of Canadian women currently over age 65 have had a job at some point in their lifetime and nine per cent are still working, despite being past the usual age of retirement.

That is part of a new portrait of women over 65 released today by Statistics Canada, based on data from the census, household survey and other research.

In a marked change from in the past, more women in this group have worked or are working. In 1976, just 58.4 per cent of women over age 65 had ever held a job in their lifetime.

And just a decade ago, only 4.8 per cent of senior women worked, so the percentage of those with jobs has nearly doubled since then.

That trend to continue working reflects in part the longer lives senior women expect to live and a drop in senior incomes in the past decade. There's a new confidence that the world of work can help them stay above the poverty line. 

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Study: Women in Canada: Senior women - STATISTICS CANADA

Originally published: March 30, 2016
Publisher: Statcan.gc.ca 

Almost 90% of senior women reported having been employed in their lifetime. Over the last several decades, women have increasingly become labour force participants, resulting in a rising proportion of senior women having been employed in their lifetime.

In 1976, 58.4% of women aged 65 and older had ever worked for pay in their lifetime. By 2015, this had increased to 89.3%. While this proportion was still lower than that for senior men, the gender gap had narrowed considerably, falling from 40.0 percentage points in 1976 to 8.6 percentage points in 2015.

The findings are taken from "Senior Women," a chapter of Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report, released today. This chapter examines many aspects related to senior women in Canada including their socio-demographic characteristics, life expectancy, living arrangements, social participation, Internet use, health, assistance with daily living and leading causes of death, as well as economic characteristics including their labour force participation and income.

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Mentorship as Empowerment: Challenging Every Woman to Find A Mentor and Be a Mentor - BETAKIT

by Victoria Lennox 
Originally published: March 29, 2016
Publisher: Betakit.com 

The empowered woman is a force to be reckoned with. She is bold and focused, with big goals and even bigger dreams. She is not afraid to learn from failure. She is the key to greater equality in society and the future of women entrepreneurs in Canada.

This International Women’s Day, Startup Canada, Microsoft Canada and Moxie Trades, a Canadian company founded by Marissa McTasney, teamed up to inspire, connect and support the mentorship of women entrepreneurs.

In a breakfast and panel discussion with women leaders who play crucial roles in Canada’s growing entrepreneurial network, the Honourable Bardish Chagger, Minister of Small Business and Tourism noted that an estimated 1.5 million Canadians are currently employed at women-owned businesses. “The total contribution of majority-owned women businesses in our economy is upwards of 148 billion dollars a year and each year, more and more women are choosing self-employment,” she said.

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Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Woman with electric scooter told to leave Tim Hortons - CTVNEWS

Originally published: March 28, 2016
Publisher: CTVnews.ca

A woman who uses an electric scooter says she was discriminated against at a Montreal-area Tim Hortons after she was asked to leave the store.

The reason, Sharon Linehan says, is that the coffee shop manager considered her electric chair “a fire hazard.”

“I can't walk into the store. I can't stand up for more than 10 seconds at a time. So how does he want me to walk in there?” Linehan told CTV Montreal.

The incident unfolded Sunday night at a Tim Hortons in Chateauguay, Que., that Linehan often visits with her husband and friends.

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Proactive Steps to Promote Workplace Mental Health - LEXOLOGY

by Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP - Cathy Chandler
Originally published: March 28, 2016
Publisher: Lexology.com 

The workplace can play an essential role in helping individuals maintain positive mental health. However, it can also be a stressful environment that may contribute to mental health issues and illness. Three out of ten Canadian employees report that their work environments are not psychologically safe or healthy (PDF). Mental health is an important occupational health and safety issue. However, many organizations have no system or process in place to address workplace psychological risks and stressors.

Employers' Legal Obligations

Workplace mental health was not a significant issue on most employers' radar a decade ago. Today, however, workplace legislation continues to evolve in ways that enhance employers' obligations in respect of their employees' physical and mental health. Under provincial human rights and accessibility legislation, employers have a duty to accommodate employees with disabilities, including mental disabilities. Most occupational health and safety legislation across Canada includes provisions requiring employers to take steps to prevent and manage risks of workplace harassment and violence. In some cases, the legislation has been expanded to include "harm to psychological well-being" within the definition of harassment. A bill recently received Royal Asset in the Ontario Legislature, Bill 132, Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act (Supporting Survivors and Challenging Sexual Violence and Harassment), 2015, which, among other matters, amends Ontario's Occupational Health and Safety Act to include significant obligations on employers to protect individuals from sexual harassment.

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Mounties have moved on from harassment and bullying says RCMP boss - TORONTO STAR

by Jim Bronskill
Originally published: 
Publisher: TorontoStar.com 

RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson says things have got better, a month after Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale expressed dismay over allegations of sexual harassment

Canada’s top Mountie told the federal government last spring the RCMP had “moved beyond” internal issues of harassment and bullying through “concrete actions” that had fostered a more respectful workplace, newly disclosed records show.

RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson advised Steven Blaney, public safety minister at the time, that the problems had taken up a great deal of time and energy since he took the helm of the national police force three-and-a-half years earlier.

“I am pleased to report that we have worked hard to understand the challenges, implement measures to improve our culture, and establish a system in which destructive or discriminatory behaviours are not tolerated,” says Paulson’s May letter, released under the Access to Information Act.

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Male Peers Must Be Better Allies: The Other Half of the Equation - DAILY.SWARTHMORE

by Stephanie Kestelman
Originally published: March 29, 2016
Publisher: Daily.Swarthmore.edu 

Women’s History Month is as much about celebrating how far we have come as it is about paving the way to gender equality. While women have made much progress in entering and succeeding in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), economics, philosophy and other male-dominated fields, we are still far from achieving full equality. According to 2013 US-level data, female-identifying students made up only 19 percent of engineering majors, 18 percent of computer science majors, 19 percent of physics majors, and 29 percent of economics majors. Take one look around the Science Center, a philosophy seminar, or economics lectures in Sci 101 and you will see these numbers at play here at Swarthmore. It is not uncommon to be one of a few or the only woman in classes in male-dominated majors, and it’s an experience I’ve had many times.

A large part of the gender gap in these fields revolves around how women behave and how they perceive themselves. We must continue the good work being done to address this side of the issue, by encouraging women to be confident and build themselves as well as their female peers up. We must continue to build and strengthen communities of women who empower one another and push for greater equality through a coalition. For example, I admire so much the work that WICS (Women in Computer Science) does to build a strong community within Swat’s CS department.  They empower women across class years to take risks and thrive in a field that still feels like a “boys club” at times.

We must also continue to encourage female students to find mentors and faculty members who will advocate for them and incentivize them to pursue opportunities they would otherwise not take. I don’t think I would have submitted papers for publication if it hadn’t been for my male and female professors in the Economics department. I did not think I could produce worthwhile research, but they challenged me to take risks, and now I am considering pursuing a Ph.D. in economics. These are only some of the ways in which we must continue to empower female students in male-dominated fields.

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From Coca-Cola to Barbie: The fierce rise of gender-neutral advertising - DIGIDAY

by Tanya Dua
Originally published: March 29, 2016
Publisher: digiday.com 

When Mattel’s highly anticipated limited-edition Moschino Barbie hit the shelves last November, the collection sold out in less than an hour. But far more groundbreaking than the sales was the video that promoted the collaboration between Barbie and the Italian fashion house.

For the first time in 56 years, the face of the Mattel brand was a little boy with a blond faux-hawk. “Moschino Barbie is so fierce!” he says as he holds Moschino Barbie’s purse, giving the camera a cheeky little wink. The video has since amassed over 3 million views and nearly 4,000 comments on YouTube.

Barbie is far from the only brand breaking gender stereotypes, embracing ambiguity in its advertising. Spanish retail giant Zara unveiled a gender-neutral line earlier this month. Disney removed gender labels from its Halloween costumes last October, and both Target and Toys “R” Us have also done away with gender-based labeling in their stores on toys and decor. In luxury fashion, brands from Rad Hourani to Gucci and Marc Jacobs to Hermès are blurring the divide between feminine and masculine style.

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Diversity and Inclusion: Breaking the Binary - BIGTHINK

by Alicia Wallace 
Originally published: March 29, 2016
Publisher: BigThink.com 

The world is a colorful, diverse place, but we somehow minimize it to black and white. While it is easy to divide everything and everyone into polarized opposites — Democrat and Republican, homosexual and heterosexual, young and old, black and white, — there is much more to be explored, acknowledged, and appreciated. By recognizing only the dominant binaries in every category, we alienate people by squeezing them out, and stealing their visibility. When people are not visible, it is less likely that they will gain the rights and freedoms they deserve as human beings.

“An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.”

— Martin Luther King, Jr.

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To Tackle Sexual Harassment, NIH Must Address Scientists' Biases - FORBES

by Janet D. Stemwedel
Originally published: March 28, 2016
Publisher:  Forbes.com 

Scientists may have a harder time addressing problems that force them to confront their own subjective biases. Does this make swift NIH action on sexual harassment unlikely?

In a letter published in Nature, and in an on-the-record interview, NIH officials said the agency means business when it comes to addressing sexual harassment in science. This commitment, though, comes without specifics about the shape action will take — or about how long it will be before a response is mounted.

In the last decade, NIH concern about funding disparities for young and early career investigators led to decisive action that seemed to have a measurable impact on the problem, while the agency’s response to its stated concern about racial funding disparities seems to have gotten bogged down without accomplishing much.

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Education key to combating gender discrimination - CIO

by Sharon Florentine  
Originally published: March 29, 2016
Publisher: CIO.com 

A recent Elephant in the Valley survey shows that sexism, discrimination and harassment are prevalent in the Silicon Valley. But another survey reveals that awareness and education around gender sensitivity can help reduce bias, discrimination and harassment as well as increase reporting and satisfactory resolutions.

Sparked by the Ellen Pao vs. KPCB trial last year, seven women came together to gather stories and data around issues of feedback and promotion, inclusion, unconscious biases, motherhood and harassment and safety. Their study, The Elephant in the Valley, was fielded from February 2015 to April 2015 and surveyed 210 women who had more than 10 years experience in the IT field.

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How about a separate bathroom for people who are OK with discrimination? - CHICAGO TRIBUNE

by Rex W. Huppke
Originally published: March 25, 2016
Publisher: ChicagoTribune.com 

You may not know it, but every time you step into a public restroom, you are in danger.

This shocking revelation came to me this week as North Carolina’s governor signed into law a bill that that overturns local anti-discrimination protections for gay and transgender people. The law was pushed through the state legislature primarily to stop cities and counties from letting transgender people use bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity.

The governor claims that the law will “ensure privacy in bathrooms and locker rooms.”

That, of course, is a bunch of irrational nonsense and a sneaky way to limit LGBT protections under the guise of “keeping people safe.”

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Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Assessment Tools by GLOBAL LEARNING

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Global Learning’s online and in-person assessment tools are the best available on the market. They are easy to understand and use and have been validated for over 10 years by thousands of companies.
Our assessment tools can be categorized as follows.  Click on each link for a full list of assessment tools, specific to either Diversity & Inclusion or Human Resources.
To learn more about our Assessment Tools – contact us today. 

Education: Unconscious Bias - GLOBAL LEARNING

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Years ago, the idea that someone was biased in the way they looked at the world and how they treated others was a concept that few people would readily admit to and certainly not in their workplace. Extensive research from such renowned learning institutions as Harvard and Yale among others, has now illustrated to us that we are all impacted by unconscious bias or hidden blind spots that affect our attitudes and perceptions of ourselves and others and govern our behaviours as a result.
At Global Learning, we believe that awareness and education is the first step in an organization’s journey to behavioural and cultural change. We understand the importance of linking the science of unconscious bias to real-life application in the workplace and marketplace for our clients and have created programs and learning solutions that equip organizations with the knowledge, strategies and tools to mitigate risk and ensure success.

Our Unconscious Bias Specific Educational Services:

e-Learning:

High Impact Training Programs:

Webinars & Webcasts:

Overcoming Racial, Gender and Cultural Bias: A STEM Role Model Tells How She Reached the Stars - HUFFINGTONPOST

by Carol J. Carter 
Originally published: March 28, 2016
Publisher: Huffingtonpost.com 

Zyola Mix has overcome many difficulties in her personal life, as well as cultural obstacles, to pursue her dream of working in the space industry. Her road to becoming a Mechanical Designer at SEAKR Engineering began during her childhood in Hawai`i. At age five, a visit with her great uncle and cousins to Diamond Head provided a view of the stars so inspiring—“the ocean was glassy and black, perfectly reflecting the stars above,”—that Zyola decided to pursue a career in the space industry.

Her home life was difficult and, at times, abusive, which meant that Zyola was not always confident in her own abilities. Furthermore, she says, “there were many cultural, racial and gender biases to fight through.” Like other women and minorities, the prospect of trying to fit into an overwhelmingly and persistently white and male workplace was somewhat daunting. “The adults in my life either actively discouraged me,” she says, “or didn’t know enough about the STEM world to encourage me.” Still, she was able to “find refuge in books and in the story of Dr. Mae Jemison,” the first female African-American astronaut.

After deciding to move across the country to escape an abusive marriage, Zyola reconnected with her goal of doing work related to the stars—largely because she wanted to provide a stable home for her daughter and demonstrate that “any challenge can be overcome.” She “started over without a penny and suffered the stigma of trying to live on public assistance; on top of that, [she] was going to school full time, working, and raising a child alone without support.”

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Recent Harvard Study Finds Implicit and Explicit Leadership Biases Against Girls - GOOD CALL

by Terri Williams
Originally published: March 28, 2016
Publisher: Goodcall.com 

“Our research suggests that the teen girls who are key to closing the gender gap appear to face an age-old and powerful barrier: gender bias, and specifically biases about their leadership.” This quote, from the Making Caring Common Project sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education, summarizes extensive research on the implicit and explicit biases facing the next generation of female leaders.

Harvard’s recently released report, “Leaning Out: Team Girls and Leadership Biases,” contains the results of various surveys, informal interviews, and focus groups. Respondents were asked such questions as, “Do you think males or females would be better leaders?” in various professions, including business, healthcare, and politics.

The largest survey included over 17,000 U.S. students and over 2,800 international middle- and high-school students – and their parents. They were asked if they were more or less likely to increase the power given to their student council based on the leader’s gender.

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Women In Advertising, Particularly White Women, Are Still Doing Far Better Than Others - FORBES

by Avi Dan
Originally published: March 28, 2016
Publisher: Forbes.com 

A chorus of, ironically, highly successful female executives rose to bemoan gender equality in the ad industry’s annual meeting last week.

As recently as the 1980s, there were few women in important roles in agencies. Men were always in the leadership roles, men did the hiring and men were running the agencies. Advertising had to go through a generation of affirmative action programs, discrimination lawsuits, and consciousness-raising to move forward into a new reality.

Women have made many strides since. There is parity representation in account management; they outnumber men in media agencies and in in strategic planning. In the last 3 months alone six more agencies installed women CEOs. These women will do the hiring and will be the the role models to other women in their organizations over time, in all departments.

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Diversity-friendly businesses can be found via this Rochester, N.Y. startup - NY BIZ JOURNAL

by Anthony Soto 
Originally published: March 28, 2016
Publisher:  Bizjournals.com 

As Startup52 founder Chike Ukaegbu recently pointed out to New York Business Journal, finding a company with an ethnically diverse team at the helm can be difficult to find. Luckily, a new online directory is now available to help alleviate that process.

BlkGuide, a recently launched Rochester, N.Y.-based startup, provides information about local and Web-based firms that are black-owned and diversity-friendly businesses. The service features a blog, how-to content and marketing tools on how to engage consumers.

“New York leads the country in the number of black businesses, thanks to its large population, high-octane economy and status as a cultural capital,” said BlkGuide spokesperson Brian Smith in a prepared statement. “We look forward to being a resource for local businesses and consumers as the city continues to grow and evolve.

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Corporate Pressure Forces Georgia Governor to Veto Anti-LGBT Law - DIVERSITYINC

by Frank Kineavy
Originally published: Originally published: March 28, 2016
Publisher: DiversityInc.com 

Bowing to pressure from various U.S. corporations, including a handful of DiversityInc Top 50 companies, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal this morning announced he plans to veto a proposed “anti-LGBT” bill.

Deal was expected to sign the bill on May 3. Last week, companies pressured the governor to rethink the proposed bill, threatening to take their business elsewhere.

Five companies on the 2015 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list pledged their support to the LGBT community by opposing the law. Marriott International (No. 13), IBM (No. 22), The Walt Disney Company (No. 34), Time Warner (No. 41) and Verizon Communications (No. 50) last week all spoke out against the bill.

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Breaking barriers: Project aims to connect disabled job seekers with employers - CTV NEWS

Originally published: March 27, 2016
Publisher: CTVnews.com 

Tim Rose has an honours bachelor degree from Carleton University and a masters of law and human rights from the University of Nottingham. But for four years, he couldn't land a job.

Rose also has cerebral palsy, and he says that his movement disorder may have put off many employers.

"I think there is a lot of stigma, so when I showed up for interviews, even something as simple as shaking hands, which I do in a bit of a different way, people get uncomfortable," Rose told CTV News.

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Diversity and Inclusion in Manufacturing - AUTOMATIONWORLD

by Stephanie Neil 
Originally published: March 28, 2016
Publisher: Automationworld.com 

When addressing the skills gap, companies need to look beyond STEM development and start building an entirely new corporate culture.

It’s always interesting to hear chatter about how automation is going to endanger our workforce. Will the robots take over the factory floor? Yes, probably, in some aspect. But honestly, technology advances and machines have been taking our jobs for a very long time. All it means is that we, the people, have to evolve to build new skills and expertise. So it is not the automation we need to worry about. It’s us.

We have an enormous problem in manufacturing in the form of a skills shortage—from operators to engineers. We need to be preparing the next generation of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) professionals. It goes beyond just setting policies, but finding creative ways to engage young minds and direct them toward a rewarding career in modern manufacturing.

Furthermore, we as an industry need to do our part to attract more women, minorities and Millennials to the manufacturing workforce. That requires a shift in attitude and an overhaul to the current corporate culture in order to make it more diversified and inclusive.

This is a topic we will address at The Automation Conference in May. And, it was a topic of discussion at the National Society of Black Engineers annual conference in Boston last week. Here, Dr. Peggie Ward Koon, the 2014 president of the International Society of Automation (ISA) and 2015 chair of The Automation Federation, presented on the significance of a diverse and inclusive workforce to drive corporate innovation.

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Monday, March 28, 2016

Diversity Moments: The Business Case for LGBT Inclusion - GLOBAL LEARNING



Product Type: eLearning

Product Description: “Diversity Moments”

“Diversity Moments” is a unique and innovative approach to “just in time” organizational learning. This creative and comprehensive series of on-line learning “vignettes’’ is designed to introduce the user to situational aspects of diversity and inclusion content. Concise and thought provoking, these scenarios provide the learner with context, decision points, and a take-away in 3 to 5 minutes of interactive web-based training.

Topic Description: The Business Case for LGBT Inclusion

What is institutionalized homophobia? Do you know the definition of a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered person? This diversity moment teaches you a little about LGBT culture and how they, just like everyone else, have the right to work in a professional, unbiased, safe environment.

Diversity Moments: Communications Across Generations - GLOBAL LEARNING

Product Type: eLearning

Product Description: “Diversity Moments”

“Diversity Moments” is a unique and innovative approach to “just in time” organizational learning. This creative and comprehensive series of on-line learning “vignettes’’ is designed to introduce the user to situational aspects of diversity and inclusion content. Concise and thought provoking, these scenarios provide the learner with context, decision points, and a take-away in 3 to 5 minutes of interactive web-based training. “Diversity Moments” are powered by Global Learning Inc..

Topic Description: Communicating Across Generations

Our workplace values and attitudes are expressed through communication. Each generation’s communication style is unique to its members and can cause misunderstandings for other groups. This course will teach you how to deal with inter-generational conflict, and start communicating in the most effective way possible.
Contact us – for more information. 


Women say virtual reality industry needs to start with awareness of diversity - VENTURE BEAT

by Dean Takahashi
Originally published: March 26, 2016
Publisher: VentureBeat.com 

Virtual reality is about to take off in a big way. Tech advisor Digi-Capital estimates that it could be a $30 billion industry by 2020. But if follows in the footsteps of the video game industry when it comes to the issue of diversity, that could be a disaster.

That’s the view of a panel of four women that I moderated in a session during the Game Developers Conference last week at the Open Gaming Alliance lounge. Our charter was to talk about the need to diversity the people, apps, and audience for the emerging platform of virtual reality. What better

As for the game industry, it could use some help. About 22 percent of the industry’s game developers are women. Some of them suffered a lot of hostility during the GamerGate controversy. But there’s been a lot of positive reaction that came from that open hostility, including efforts by Intel to double the number of women in games over the next decade, as well as an effort to combat online harassment. There’s more discussion about diversity in games than ever, including our discussion about the challenge of VR and diversity.

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4 Reasons Why Regular Employee Training Is Critically Important - TLNT

by Laura Stack
Originally published: March 25, 2016
Publisher: TLNT.com 

Regular training for your employees is integral to productivity and profitability, meaning it’s something you should never take for granted.

Among other things, training will do this:


  1. It improves confidence and, therefore, performance — When people know they’ve been equipped to do their jobs properly, it boosts their spirits and reassures them they can achieve levels of competency and productivity they haven’t realized in the past. Further, when employees understand why their work matters and how to do it, they’re more likely to hit the mark or go above and beyond.
  2. Saves the company money — Well-trained employees make fewer errors and require less direct supervision. Furthermore, they spend less time thinking about problem solving, because they already know what to do. Consistent training also decreases employee turnover — a big drain on corporate costs.
  3. Earns the company money — While money saved is equivalent to money earned, directly fattening the bottom line makes people sit up and take notice. A few years ago, Nations Hotel Company invested heavily in coaching and saw an ROI of 221 percent.
  4. Increases employee productivity — Motorola long since realized that every dollar invested in training can yield as much as a 30 percent gain in productivity within three years. That let the company cut costs by $3 billion and increase profits by 47 percent in 2000 alone. According to another report — The 2001 Global Training and Certification Study by testing firms CompTIA and Prometric — as little as a 2 percent increase in productivity can result in a 100 percent increase in training ROI.

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Female Programmers Make Only 72% Of Male Wages: What Are We Going To Do About It? - FORBES

by Tim Worstall 
Originally published: March 25 2016
Publisher: Forbes.com 

In the details of that recent Glassdoor survey of male and female wages is an interesting little point that the Wall Street Journal has picked up on. Among computer programmers the gender pay gap GPS +0.14% appears to be an alarmingly large 72%. That is, female programmers get paid only that percentage of male programming wages. As they say:

Mind the Gender Pay Gap: Female Computer Programmers Earn 72 Cents on the Dollar, Study Says

That looks like it’s a large enough difference that we’d like to do something about it, doesn’t it? The obvious question though is, well, what do we do about it? Because as ever with these sorts of gross numbers this isn’t a very good guide to policy. For:

Computer programmers, some of the oldest workers in the tech industry, have the largest gender pay gap compared to all other professions across all industries, according to a new study.

Women who write the software that runs on mainframe computers earn on average 72 cents per dollar earned by their male counterparts, according to research conducted by Glassdoor Inc., the online job information firm. That pay gap exists even after controlling for age, education, experience, job title, employer and location.

Yes, but, is that some point that is specific to the mainframe computing, or even the computing, industry in general? Or is that a reflection of something more societal?

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A New Twist In The Debate: N.C., Georgia Legislatures Try To Fight Back Against Corporate Boycotts - FORBES

by Anna Fields 
Originally published: March 26, 2016
Publisher:  Forbes.com 

It’s been less than 36 hours since NC Governor Pat McCrory signed a controversial transgender bill into law.

House Bill 2, the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act, puts in place a statewide policy that bans many transgender individuals from using public bathrooms. The bill is largely a response to — and also undoes — Charlotte, NC’s, recent attempt to protect these same individuals from exactly this kind of discrimination by the state.

McCrory, a Republican, (who, ironically, was the longest-serving mayor of Charlotte before leaving for his current job), signed the bill Wednesday night and tweeted, “Ordinance defied common sense, allowing men to use women’s bathroom/locker room for instance. That’s why I signed bipartisan bill to stop it.”

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Best, Worst States Named For Disability Employment - DISABILITY SCOOP

by  Shaun Heasley
Originally published: March 25, 2016
Publisher: DisabilityScoop.com 

For people with disabilities, new figures suggest that the odds of having a job varies dramatically depending on where an individual lives.

While 50 percent of people with disabilities are employed in South Dakota, just half as many are working in West Virginia.

The two states represent the best and worst across the nation when it comes to disability employment, according to the Disability Statistics Annual Report, a by-the-numbers look at how Americans with disabilities are faring produced by the University of New Hampshire’s Institute on Disability.


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