Thursday, September 14, 2017

Racism in Your Spare Time: What Are The Legal Limits for Employers? - JD SUPRA

by Mark Konkel and Alyssa Smilowitz
Originally published: September 13, 2017
Publisher: JDSupra.com 


On Saturday, August 12, as the nation watched, protests in Charlottesville, Virginia regarding the anticipated removal of a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee turned deadly. In the days and weeks after, both the small city and the country wrestled to make sense of the events. In the aftermath, employers too were forced to make decisions and judgment calls as the online community identified specific individuals as white supremacists.

We suspect that most of our readers, like us, don’t like white supremacists. But even apart from the moral implications of Charlottesville, the public acts of employees can impact the public goodwill, brand and reputation of an employer—that is, the most valuable things a company has. So when an employee associated with a particular employer engages in distasteful, or hateful, or outrageous public conduct, what can an employer do? Should the employees be terminated? Disciplined? Allowed to do and say whatever they want while not at work?